show/hide profile info
Register to take part
email

CHANGES TO POLICE OATH

  • 0 Replies
  • 3758 Views

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

*

Offline the leveller

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • 3515
  • +75/-0
CHANGES TO POLICE OATH
« on: September 22, 2012, 08:10:27 PM »
I, ... of ... do solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will well and truly serve the Queen in the office of constable, with fairness, integrity, diligence and impartiality, upholding fundamental human rights and according equal respect to all people; and that I will, to the best of my power, cause the peace to be kept and preserved and prevent all offences against people and property; and that while I continue to hold the said office I will to the best of my skill and knowledge discharge all the duties thereof faithfully according to law.   

?
U.K.Police oath since 2002




 Pre 2002 Oath

"I, ... ... ... ... of ... ... ... ... do solemnly and sincerely declare and affirm that I will well and truly serve Our Sovereign Lady the Queen in the office of constable, without favour or affection, malice or ill will; and that I will to the best of my power cause the peace to be kept and preserved, and prevent all offences against the persons and properties of Her Majesty?s subjects; and that while I continue to hold the said office I will to the best of my skill and knowledge discharge all the duties thereof faithfully according to law."



Notice "Our Sovereign Lady", which is the most important change in the current version: it was changed because the govt allowed foreigners to serve in the UK police force which was not the case historically. This of course paves the way for Europol or whatever, does it not?

It also replaces "favour or affectation, malice or ill will" with "fairness, integrity, diligence and impartiality, upholding fundamental human rights and according equal respect to all people". Probably ECHR/HRA related...
You shall swear, that you will well and truly serve our Sovereign Lord the King in the office of Constable for the township of ... in this manor, (hundred or county) for the year now next ensuing, or until you shall be thereof discharged by due course of law; you shall see the King's peace kept, and keep all such watch and ward as are usually accustomed and ought to be kept; and you shall well and truly do and execute all other things belonging to the said office according to the best of your knowledge. So help you God." (Joseph Ritson, The Office of Constable, 1791)


You shall well and truly serve our sovereign lord the King, and the lord of this leet, in the office of Constable and and for the hundred of, &c, or parish of, &c, for the year ensuing, or until you shall be thereof discharged according to due course of law; you shall well and truly do and execute all things belonging to the said office, according to the best of your knowledge. So help you God." (Williams' Law Dictionary 1816)

...
The latter is stated as being set out in Acts of Parliament referred to as "Stat. 13 & 14 Car. 2" which I assume correspond to the "Vexatious Arrests and Delays at Law Act 1661" and the "Act of Settlement 1662" passed during the reign of Charles II. ("Carolus" in Latin.) The latter does not contain an oath but does refer to certain functions of the position, and I cannot find the former.

Ritson states that the position of constable was an invention of the Statute of Winchester and not common law: "And though Fitzherbert, and Crompton after him, have asserted that they [constables] were conservators of the peace at the Common Law; and though it is said in other books that 'not withstanding the opinions to the contrary' the high constable was an officer at the Common Law and the Statute of Wynton [Winchester] only enlarged his authority, yet no one has hitherto produced the least evidence in support of such assertion." This probably comes from Blackstone who says that high constables were created by Wynton and petty constables during the reign of Edward III, and the latter "replaced" the offices of headborough and tithing-man which dated back to Alfred the Great (though Blackstone writes that they were still extant in his time). No idea whether that's the case, but Parliament fiddling and messing about again? Good lord...


email
 
Share this topic...
In a forum
(BBCode)
In a site/blog
(HTML)



COMODO SECURE

Powered by EzPortal
Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 
Comodo SSL