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Tory MP 'murdered' boy at orgy, abuse victim claims
« on: November 19, 2014, 10:41:57 AM »
Our thanks to Peter for this story.

And PLEASE, let's not pretend that a man desiring a boy is anything but a homosexual. Why does the West celebrate this?

Don

Telegraph

Tory MP 'murdered' boy at orgy, abuse victim claims

Scotland Yard is investigating three 'possible murders' linked to a Westminster paedophile ring that was allegedly operating in the 1970s and 1980s
Operation Fairbank was set two years ago by Scotland Yard to look into the claims of By Martin Evans, Crime Correspondent

11:18AM GMT 16 Nov 2014

A Conservative MP murdered a young boy during a depraved sex party in the 1980s, an alleged victim of the Westminster paedophile scandal has claimed.


The 12-year-old boy, who was being abused by a group of men, was strangled by the politician at a luxury townhouse in front of other victims, it has been alleged.


On another occasion, the victim claims a young boy, who was around ten-years-old, was deliberately run down and killed by a car being driven by one of his abusers.


The alleged murders are among three that are now being investigated by the Metropolitan Police as part of a major probe into claims that a powerful paedophile ring with links to Westminster was operating in Britain in the 1970s and 1980s.


Scotland Yard, which set up Operation Fairbank two years ago to look at the abuse claims, announced on Friday it had launched a fresh strand of the inquiry, entitled Operation Midland, to probe the alleged murders.


The allegations emerged after a man, who is now in his 40s, came forward claiming to have been one of around 15 boys, who were abused at the hands of a powerful paedophile network operating some 30-years ago.

He claims after being handed to the group by his father, he was regularly picked up in cars and taken to hotels and apartments, where he was physically and sexually abused by “senior military and political” figures.

Some of the abuse allegedly took place at flats in the Dolphin Square development in Pimlico, where a number of politicians have London homes.

The man, who has spoken at length to Scotland Yard detectives, said he had witnessed two murders of abuse victims by members of the group.

He told the Sunday People that he had been in the same room as a 12-year-old boy, when a Tory MP throttled him to death.

He described the boy as being around 12-years-old and having brown hair, but said he did not know his name.

The murder was allegedly witnessed by another abuse victim who was in the room at the same time.

He said: “I watched while that happened. I am not sure how I got out of that. Whether I will ever know why I survived, I am not sure.”

On another occasion he claims a member of the gang deliberately ran over one of the victims, in what he described as an effort to demonstrate their power.

A third boy was murdered during a depraved orgy at which another Tory MP was present, the man has told detectives.

On Friday, Scotland Yard announced that it was now investigating a “possible homicide” as part of its ongoing probe into historic child sex abuse.

A spokesman said: “Over the past month, detectives working on Operation Fairbank within the Met's Specialist Crime and Operations have been made aware of allegations concerning serious non-recent sexual abuse, said to have occurred over 30 years ago.

“Our inquiries into this, over subsequent weeks, have revealed further information regarding possible homicide. Based on our current knowledge, this is the first time that this specific information has been passed to the Met.”

The spokesman went on: “Detectives from the Child Abuse Investigation Command are working closely with colleagues from the Homicide and Major Crime Command concerning this information, which is being looked at under the name of Operation Midland.”



Which Former PM Is Linked To A Paedophile Ring?
An unnamed former British Prime Minister has been linked to a "powerful paedophile ring" following a bombshell question during PMQs. Tom Watson, who became a...


 

View on www.huffingtonpost.c...
Tom Watson Links Unnamed Former Prime Minister To Paedophile Ring
The Huffington Post UK  | By Stephen Hull
Posted:  24/10/2012 12:35 BST Updated:  24/12/2012 10:12 GMT
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An unnamed former British Prime Minister has been linked to a "powerful paedophile ring" following a bombshell question during PMQs.

Tom Watson, who became a household name after his dogged pursuit of News International over phone hacking, threw a curveball at David Cameron during the session on Wednesday.

The West Bromwich MP asked a hushed house: "The evidence file used to convict paedophile Peter Righton, if it still exists, contains clear evidence of a widespread paedophile ring.

"One of its members boasts of his links to a senior aide of a former prime minister who says he could smuggle indecent images of children from abroad."


Tom Watson tweeted he was 'anxious' about asking the question

At this point cameras covering PMQs cut to David Cameron who was sitting forward in his chair, clutching his binder and looking extremely serious.

Watson continued: "The leads were not followed up, but if the files still exists I want to ensure that the Metropolitan Police secure the evidence, re-examine it and investigate clear intelligence suggesting a powerful paedophile network linked to Parliament and Number 10."

There was an uncomfortable silence in the chamber before the current PM took to his feet.

tom watson


David Cameron looked concerned at the direction the question was going

Cameron said: "The honourable gentleman raises a very difficult and complex case and I'm not entirely sure which former PM he's referring to.

"What I'd like to do is look very carefully at Hansard about the allegations... and look very carefully to see what the government can do to help give him the assurances that he seeks."

A report from the Independent newspaper in September 1992 described the Righton case. It says:


A LEADING expert in residential childcare was fined pounds 900 yesterday when he admitted importing and possessing illegal homosexual pornographic material.

Magistrates at Evesham, Worcestershire, heard that the material included copies of a recognised paedophile magazine and photographs of young boys under the age of 16 posing partly dressed or naked.

Peter Righton, 66, of Badsey Road, Evesham, admitted two illegal importation charges and one charge of possessing obscene material. He was ordered to pay pounds 75 costs and the magistrates ordered that the magazines should be destroyed.

Read the full article here

Righton is also mentioned in this piece by Nick Davies, the journalist whose claims about phone hacking at News of the World lead to the closure of the publication.

Note: These papers need to be  fully released because there are suspicions  they were subject to a wholly  exceptional 100 year secrecy ruling because they involve a paedophile ring including powerful politicians  and other establishment figures. RH




BBC NEWS | UK | Scotland | Father's plea over Dunblane papers

The father of a child killed in the 1996 Dunblane tragedy says police information on the killer should be made public.
View on news.bbc.co.uk

You are in: Scotland 
     
  Tuesday, 11 February, 2003, 08:12 GMT
Father's plea over Dunblane papers


Floral tribute
Floral tribute after Dunblane tragedy

The father of a child killed in the Dunblane tragedy has called for police information on the killer to be made public.
Scotland's most senior law officer has been urged to explain why documents on Thomas Hamilton were banned from publication for 100 years.

The Crown Office denied that they have been suppressed because they revealed links between the killer and a number of prominent Scots.

Charlie Clydesdale, whose daughter Victoria was killed, said an explanation should be given.

Charlie Clydesdale


 I would really like to see what was in it



Charlie Clydesdale
 


And Scottish National Party MSP Michael Matheson wants the ban reconsidered in light of the new freedom of information legislation.

Forty-three-year-old Hamilton, broke into Dunblane Primary School on 13 March, 1996 and opened fire on a class in the gym, killing 16 children and a teacher.

'Draconian act'

In addition to those killed, he injured 12 other children and two teachers before killing himself.

Mr Clydesdale questioned the length of the ban and described his family's frustrations.

He said: "I'm not going to be around and my children aren't going to be around.

"I would really like to see what was in it, but I'm surprised there was one and shocked there was such a length of time put on it."


Michael Matheson MSP
Michael Matheson: "Secrecy order"


Mr Matheson said he has sought clarification from the Lord Advocate Colin Boyd QC.

The MSP told BBC Scotland: "I think it's surprising that in this day and age we find ourselves with 100-year secrecy order being applied to a police report.

"Keeping in mind that Cabinet papers are only classified for 30 years, I want to find out what the legal status of this act is.

"And find out why such a draconian act has been carried out."

The Crown Office dismissed allegations that information about Hamilton was being kept secret because it contained information about senior political figures in Scotland.

'Avoid causing distress'

It said that some documents deemed sensitive were kept under a "75 year closure".

However, the Scottish Office, the Crown Office and Lord Cullen, who led the inquiry into the Dunblane shootings, agreed that some information should be kept for 100 years.

"This was to ensure that information would not be made public during the lifetime of any of the children (or their siblings) identified in the documents," said a Crown Office spokesman.

"There is no question of this action being taken to protect the identities or involvement of any public figures - the decision was made simply to protect the identities of the children involved, and to avoid causing them distress throughout their lives.

"The new Freedom of Information legislation is not relevant in this context," the spokesman added.
 
   
  WATCH/LISTEN 
   
  ON THIS STORY 
   
  Kate Fawcett reports
"There is pressure for an explanation"
 
See also:

09 Feb 03 | Scotland
Dunblane report inquiry call


14 May 00 | Scotland
Dunblane mothers join anti-gun march


21 Apr 99 | UK
Dunblane victims remembered


21 Apr 99 | Education
Dunblane offers expert help



Internet links:



Official Dunblane Inquiry

Dunblane Against Guns

National Rifle Association

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


Telegraph

Westminster 'paedophile ring': now where does the investigation go?

How did Dolphin Square - the Pimlico apartment complex favoured by generations of Establishment figures - become the latest focus for the ever-widening investigation into Westminster child sex abuse claims?

The Palace of Westminster


Andrew Gilligan

By Andrew Gilligan

8:16PM GMT 15 Nov 2014




'Both MPs were brutal,” says “Nick”, in his account of being abused as an 11-year-old by two Conservative politicians. “I was raped over a bathtub, while my head was submerged beneath the water. One [MP] attempted to get me to beat another boy with a baton. I refused, and was physically and sexually punished for it.”


Another alleged victim was 13 when an MP took him to a “dinner party” for about a dozen people in the same block of flats. “There were a mixture of boys and girls, aged between 13 and 15,” he said. “They would put a porn film on when things would calm down. It took a few minutes or so, and then they would feel you.” He was raped, he said, in one of the bedrooms.


Both men, speaking to the Exaro News website, were describing what they say happened to them about 35 years ago at Dolphin Square, a riverside apartment complex in Pimlico much favoured by MPs, civil servants and other establishment figures. Nick says another of his rapists there was Sir Peter Hayman, the former deputy director of MI6, a member of the notorious Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE) convicted of gross indecency in 1984. In total, he says, he went to the riverside complex around 10 times. Nick is now a key witness in a new Dolphin Square strand of the Metropolitan Police investigation into alleged historic child sex abuse.


Dolphin Square is not the only way the story of a claimed Westminster “abuse conspiracy” has continued to broaden. Just as the dust was settling on Home Secretary Theresa May’s troubled review of historic sex abuse allegations – a second chairman, lawyer Fiona Woolf, had resigned over a potential conflict of interest – it emerged last week that one crime being investigated by the police was a “possible murder”. Last week, too, an official inquiry into the Home Office’s handling of child sex abuse claims in the 1980s failed to uncover any of the missing documents that prompted the investigation.


The review, centring on concerns that civil servants ignored information passed on by Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens in the 1980s, dashed hopes that the so-called “Dickens dossier” might still exist in some Home Office basement.


Can what happened to Nick and the others really be true? Was there really a Westminster cabal, a ring of abusers who looked out for each other and protected themselves from justice? The answer, perhaps, is both yes and no. Just as at the BBC and in the NHS, there can be no doubt that serious abuse occurred in public life in the Seventies and Eighties, and that powerful public figures, including at least two MPs, got away with it. As early as 1970, Cyril Smith, soon to become the Liberal MP for Rochdale, was found by the police to have “used his unique position to indulge in a sordid series of indecent episodes with young boys towards whom he had a special responsibility”. No action was taken, and Smith was allowed to carry on abusing children for most of the rest of his life.

Sir Peter Morrison, Margaret Thatcher’s parliamentary private secretary, was caught more than once molesting underage boys, but managed to avoid being charged. He used Britain’s sledgehammer libel laws to prevent his exposure by the press.

Morrison’s paedophilia was known to at least some of his colleagues; his successor as MP for Chester, Gyles Brandreth, recalls being told in 1996 by the then Welsh Secretary and current Leader of the House, William Hague, that Morrison, who had died the year before, “might feature” in the inquiry into sex abuse in north Wales children’s homes. Edwina Currie, the former Tory minister, described Morrison as a “noted pederast”.

Hayman was arrested in the Seventies after leaving a packet of “obscene literature” on a bus. Officers raided his flat, finding correspondence with other PIE members in which they shared their desire for child abuse, but Hayman was not charged. He was mentioned in the trial of five fellow members of the PIE, but only under a pseudonym. Intense, but unsuccessful, efforts were made by ministers to stop Mr Dickens naming him in Parliament, which was how his identity eventually emerged.

There have also been persistent reports of an abuse ring centred on a guest house in Barnes, south-west London. Names on a list of visitors kept by the owners include Smith, Hayman and those of some other former politicians who are still alive.

But perhaps the most disturbing evidence concerns Peter Righton, a founder member of the PIE, and a senior figure in the world of child protection for decades. Director of education at the National Institute for Social Work and a consultant to the National Children’s Bureau, Righton advised the Home Office on child care and led official inquiries into abuse at children’s homes. He also had close links with Islington council, under whose care hundreds of children were abused in the 1980s. Some of them came to stay on the country estate in Suffolk where he lived.

In 1992, Righton was arrested. Thousands of documents were seized from his home, some, according to the local chief constable, implicating “establishment figures, including senior members of the clergy”, in abuse. But Righton was convicted only on the relatively minor charge of importing child abuse images, receiving a £900 fine. No one else was charged.

Of the solid evidence produced so far, it is perhaps Righton’s case that offers the best potential for proving some kind of establishment “network”. But for those alleging an overarching political cover-up, a secret conspiracy, the difficult truth is that Righton and his like were actually quite open about what they were doing.

In 1977, in an article in Social Work Today, he was quoted as saying sex between workers and residents in care homes was perfectly acceptable. “Provided there is no question of exploitation, sexual relationships freely entered into by residents – including adolescents – should not be a matter for automatic inquiry,” he wrote.

Righton was also one of several apparently respectable figures to contribute to a book called Perspectives on Paedophilia, published as late as 1981 by a serious academic imprint, Batsford, which made a strong defence of sex with minors. Edited by a Sussex University academic, Brian Taylor, it aimed to challenge what Dr Taylor’s introduction called the “prejudice” against child sex. Disturbingly, the book was aimed at “social workers, community workers, probation officers and child care workers”.

The public, wrote Dr Taylor, “generally thinks of paedophiles as sick or evil men who lurk around school playgrounds in the hope of attempting unspecified beastliness with unsuspecting innocent children”. That, he reassured readers, was merely a “stereotype”, both “inaccurate and unhelpful”, which flew in the face of the “empirical realities of paedophile behaviour”. Why, most adult-child sexual relationships occurred in the family!

“The isolation, secrecy, guilt and anguish of many paedophiles,” wrote another contributor, Professor Ken Plummer, “are not intrinsic to the phenomen[on] but are derived from the extreme social repression placed on minorities… Paedophiles are told they are the seducers and rapists of children; they know their experiences are often loving and tender ones. They are told that children are pure and innocent, devoid of sexuality; they know both from their own experiences of childhood and from the children they meet that this is not the case.” Professor Plummer, who was a member of the PIE, remains an active member of Essex University’s sociology department, where he continues to teach.

Graham Powell, another contributor to the book, is now one of the country’s most distinguished psychologists, a past president of the British Psychological Society and a current provider of psychology support services to the Serious Organised Crime Agency, the National Crime Squad, the Metropolitan Police, Kent Police, Essex Police and the Internet Watch Foundation. In Perspectives on Paedophilia, however, he co-authored a chapter that stated: “In the public mind, paedophile attention is generally assumed to be traumatic and to have lasting and wholly deleterious consequences for the victim. The evidence that we have considered here does not support this view… We need to ask not why are the effects of paedophile action so large, but why so small.”

On the Left, the National Council for Civil Liberties granted the PIE official “affiliate” status in 1975. It put a PIE leader, Tom O’Carroll, on one of its working groups, made him a platform speaker at a conference in spring 1977, and strongly defended paedophiles against “hysterical and inaccurate” newspaper attacks.

With the Pill, the legalisation of homosexuality and shrinking taboos against premarital sex, the Seventies was an era of sudden sexual emancipation. To some, sex by or with children was just another repressive boundary that had to be swept away. Britain’s half-hearted liberalisation of homosexuality – until recently, the gay age of consent was 21, five years above heterosexuals – also allowed the likes of O’Carroll and the PIE to cleverly conflate their perverted agenda with the legitimate demands of young gay adults.

As recently as 1995, Tim Fortescue, a Tory whip in the early Seventies, was prepared to tell a TV interviewer how the whips at the time would help “get a chap out of trouble” with difficulties such as a “scandal involving small boys”. To some, that may seem decisive evidence for the existence of cover-ups. But not much was made of it in 1995.

None of this is to excuse the harm done to the victims, or to deny how utterly wrong the paedophile apologists were – as Dr Powell, among them, now admits. But it does help show another reason why the abusers so often got away with it – not necessarily because of any active conspiracy, but because the climate of the Seventies and Eighties was simply more confused and child abuse was taken less seriously.

Most people, on the Left and Right, never fell for the PIE’s cynical rhetoric about “child lib”. Indeed, the group’s activities caused a significant public backlash. But for sophisticated opinion, the likes of Mr Dickens, with his dossiers and his calls for birching child abusers, were seen as faintly comical, clodhopping figures. A little like immigration today, child sex abuse was seen as something that only tabloid newspapers got worked up about, not something for civilised liberals to concern themselves with.

But the conspiracy element cannot be wholly dismissed. After abuse was revealed at the BBC, the police and courts made brisk progress, charging and, in many cases, convicting a string of showbiz figures under Operation Yewtree. Operation Fairbank, the investigation into abuse in public life, is only a few months younger than Yewtree. But despite rather similar evidence – the testimony of victims – absolutely no one active, or formerly active, in politics has yet even been charged. It would be wrong if former MPs and ministers were more protected from prosecution than Rolf Harris, Max Clifford or Dave Lee Travis.
Tory MP 'murdered' boy at orgy, abuse victim claims


Telegraph 

Westminster paedophile ring investigated over murder links

Scotland Yard is looking at claims that an alleged paedophile ring with links to former government figures, could have been involved in a murder





The site of the former Elm Guest House in Barnes 

The site of the former Elm House Guest House in Barnes, where abuse is alleged to have taken place Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images





By Martin Evans, Crime Correspondent

7:36PM GMT 14 Nov 2014




Detectives investigating allegations of a paedophile ring with links to Westminster are now examining connections to a possible murder, the Metropolitan Police has said.


Scotland Yard launched Operation Fairbank two years ago to probe suggestions that high profile political figures had been involved in organised child sex abuse in the 1970s and 1980s.


But now officers have set up a new strand of the inquiry, named Operation Midland, after being passed information about alleged murders that may have been connected with the paedophiles.


It is understood there are no confirmed identities for the suspected victims and no bodies at this stage, meaning the Metropolitan Police have only been willing to describe the investigation as examining a “possible murder”.


A Scotland Yard spokesman said: “Over the past month, detectives working on Operation Fairbank within the Met's Specialist Crime and Operations have been made aware of allegations concerning serious non-recent sexual abuse, said to have occurred over 30 years ago.


“Our inquiries into this, over subsequent weeks, have revealed further information regarding possible homicide. Based on our current knowledge, this is the first time that this specific information has been passed to the Met.”

The spokesman went on: “Detectives from the Child Abuse Investigation Command are working closely with colleagues from the Homicide and Major Crime Command concerning this information, which is being looked at under the name of Operation Midland.”

Operation Fairbank was launched in response to information passed on by MP Tom Watson, who used Prime Minister's Questions in 2012 to air claims that there was a paedophile ring with links to Number 10.

Mr Watson used parliamentary privilege to allege that a file of evidence used to convict Peter Righton of importing child pornography in 1992 contained "clear intelligence" of a sex abuse gang.

He wrote to Scotland Yard, which has since spawned two more inquiries from Fairbank - Fernbridge, which is looking at claims linked to the Elm Guest House in Barnes, south west London, in the 1980s, and Cayacos.

Speaking to the BBC, one of the alleged victims claimed that "senior military and political figures" had been involved in the abuse of youngsters in the 1970s and 1980s.

The man, who is now in his 40s and whose identity has been protected, claimed he had been regularly abused by a gang between 1975 and 1984.

He said he was one of between 15 and 20 children, who would be picked up in cars and taken to hotels and apartments, where they were physically and sexually abused.

He said: "They were very powerful people and they controlled my life for the next nine years. They created fear that penetrated every part of me, day in day out. You didn't question what they wanted, you did as they asked without question and the punishments were very severe."

He added: "They had no hesitation in doing what they wanted to do," Nick said. "Some of them were quite open about who they were. They had no fear at all of being caught, it didn't cross their mind."

The man's claims are understood to be among a number now being assessed by the Metropolitan Police.

In August, Scotland Yard said it had tripled the number of officers investigating the allegations of sex abuse in the wake of the claims of a Westminster cover-up.

Telegraph 


Westminster paedophile ring investigated over murder links

Scotland Yard is looking at claims that an alleged paedophile ring with links to former government figures, could have been involved in a murder





The site of the former Elm Guest House in Barnes 

The site of the former Elm House Guest House in Barnes, where abuse is alleged to have taken place Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images





By Martin Evans, Crime Correspondent

3:31PM GMT 14 Nov 2014




Detectives investigating allegations of organised child sex abuse in the 1970s and 1980s are now examining possible murder links, the Metropolitan Police has said.


Officers working on Operation Fairbank, which was launched to investigate allegations that a paedophile ring with links to government operated more than 30-years ago, have now uncovered information regarding a possible murder.


They have now launched a new strand of the investigation called Operation Midland, but have said the inquiry is still in its very early stages.


A Scotland Yard spokesman said: “Over the past month, detectives working on Operation Fairbank within the Met's Specialist Crime and Operations have been made aware of allegations concerning serious non-recent sexual abuse, said to have occurred over 30 years ago.


“Our inquiries into this, over subsequent weeks, have revealed further information regarding possible homicide. Based on our current knowledge, this is the first time that this specific information has been passed to the Met.”



The spokesman went on: “Detectives from the Child Abuse Investigation Command are working closely with colleagues from the Homicide and Major Crime Command concerning this information, which is being looked at under the name of Operation Midland.”



Operation Fairbank was launched in response to information passed on by MP Tom Watson, who used Prime Minister's Questions in 2012 to air claims that there was a paedophile ring with links to Number 10.

Mr Watson used parliamentary privilege to allege that a file of evidence used to convict Peter Righton of importing child pornography in 1992 contained "clear intelligence" of a sex abuse gang.

He wrote to Scotland Yard, which has since spawned two more inquiries from Fairbank - Fernbridge, which is looking at claims linked to the Elm Guest House in Barnes, south west London, in the 1980s, and Cayacos.

Speaking to the BBC, one of the alleged victims, claimed that "senior military and political figures" had been involved in the abuse of youngsters in the 1970s and 1980s.

The man, who is now in his 40s and whose identity has been protected, claimed he had been regularly abused by a gang between 1975 and 1984.

He said he was one of between 15 and 20 children, who would be picked up in cars and taken to hotels and apartments, where they were physically and sexually abused.

He said: "They were very powerful people and they controlled my life for the next nine years. They created fear that penetrated every part of me, day in day out. You didn't question what they wanted, you did as they asked without question and the punishments were very severe."

He added: "They had no hesitation in doing what they wanted to do," Nick said. "Some of them were quite open about who they were. They had no fear at all of being caught, it didn't cross their mind."

The man's claims are now being assessed by the Metropolitan Police, but it remains unclear where the allegation of a possible murder has emerged from.







Note: Things they should have  included in their searches which I will bet they have not included :




1. Once they found files were missing they should have looked at files of a similar age to see how often these had survived. If the survival pattern of material other than that of the paedophile claims was substantially different to the missing paedophile material that would be grounds for believing that the paedophile material had been wilfully destroyed.




2. Government departments keep what are known as subject files. These are just what the name suggests, files which cover particular topics and which are added to by head office civil servants if material is of serious or general interest. Their value here is that they are never thrown away.  Consequently, there is a decent chance that a toxic issue such as that of the Dickens' allegations would have generated material relating to the claims which was placed in subject files.  Odds on the investigation did not include these.




3. The personal papers of the relevant ministers at the time and the civil servants who reported directly to them.




4. Met Police  records.




5. Security agencies records.




RH



Telegraph

Theresa May: Home Office could have covered up paedophile claims

Home Secretary triggers further inquiries after report by Peter Wanless fails to 'prove or disprove' whether Home Office covered up historic child sex abuse allegations





The inquiry centred on claims that the Home Office failed to act on allegations made by Geoffrey Dickens MP in the Eighties

The inquiry centred on claims that the Home Office failed to act on allegations made by Geoffrey Dickens MP in the Eighties Photo: REX





David Barrett

By David Barrett, Home Affairs Correspondent

5:35PM GMT 11 Nov 2014




Theresa May, the Home Secretary, has admitted the Home Office could have covered up paedophile allegations in the Eighties, as she was forced to launch another new inquiry into the claims.


She told the House of Commons a report she commissioned in the summer had been unable to “prove or disprove” reports that historic child sex abuse allegations had been swept under the carpet.


However, David Cameron, the Prime Minister, offered a different interpretation of the report by head of the NSPCC Peter Wanless and Richard Whittam QC.


Mr Cameron appeared to misinterpret the report’s conclusions by insisting: "I think it is important that it says that there wasn't a cover up some of the people who've been looking for conspiracy theories will have to look elsewhere."


In the House of Commons Mrs May said of the report’s conclusions: “They do not prove or disprove allegations about the Home Office in the Eighties.



“I cannot stand here and say that during the Eighties the Home Office was not involved in a cover-up. There might have been a cover-up.



“That is why we have set up an inquiry and we are determined to get to the truth.”

The Home Secretary said that apart from the overarching child sex abuse – which is still without a chairman after the resignation of Fiona Woolf last month – she had asked police and MI5 to carry out further reviews of how they handled allegations of child sex abuse.

And in a further development, Scotland Yard has been asked by Mrs May to look into claims by an investigative journalist that Special Branch officers confiscated a dossier containing a list of 16 MPs and peers allegedly involved in promoting a paedophile group.

Don Hale said he was given the file by Barbara Castle, the former Labour Cabinet minister, which detailed the activities of a controversial group called Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE).

The developments came after Mr Wanless published results of his inquiry into how the Home Office dealt with information handed over by the late Conservative MP Geoffrey Dickens, as well as other allegations in 114 missing, lost or destroyed files.

He disclosed that one of the files was destroyed as recently as 2012, after being transferred from the Home Office to the Ministry of Justice.

Its title referred to the PIE and Charles Oxley, a Christian campaigner who infiltrated the group in the Eighties, and Steven Adrian Smith, a former chairman of the group who has since been imprisoned for possessing indecent images of children.

However, one of the 114 files entitled ‘DNA – Paedophiles’ has now been located, the report said.

It went on: "It is ... not possible to say whether files were ever removed or destroyed to cover up or hide allegations of organised or systematic child abuse by particular individuals because of the systems then in place.

"It follows that we cannot say that no file was removed or destroyed for that reason."

Mr Dickens wrote to Leon Brittan, the then home secretary, now Lord Brittan of Spennithorne, in 1983 to say he would expose eight public figures who he suspected of child abuse unless action was taken.

The review by Mr Wanless did not unearth the ‘Dickens dossier’ but it did give details of another set of papers which showed how Mr Dickens made repeated contact with Lord Brittan, urging him to act against PIE.

It looked at claims by former Home Office civil servant Tim Hulbert that PIE was covertly funded by Special Branch through a Home Office grant.

The report revealed for the first time details that the PIE grant may have been hidden within a much larger sum handed to an unnamed charity.

“Mr Hulbert said he had indicated that the payment to PIE could have been part of a much larger grant award to an unrelated charity,” it said.

“The suggestion being made was that this payment was being channelled covertly through a much larger budget line, without any suggestion that the larger charity itself would in any sense need to be aware of what was happening.”

However, the Wanless review said it could find no evidence to back up Mr Hulbert’s claims.

It also emerged that MI5 told the inquiry it had been unable to find any copies of the files in its archives - appearing to quash speculation that the intelligence agency may have held the key to the mystery.

Mrs May said she had accepted recommendations made by Mr Wanless about improving the way the Government deals with information about child abuse.
Abuse inquiry 'fails to find dossier'
An inquiry into Home Office handling of child sex abuse claims in the 1980s has failed to uncover the missing documents that prompted the probe.

View on www.bbc.co.uk

7 November 2014 Last updated at 04:53
Wanless review 'fails to find Dickens' dossier'
Houses of Parliament The so-called "Dickens dossier" was said to contain the names of MPs suspected of being child abusers
Telegraph

Handling of child sex abuse claims in the 1980s has failed to uncover any of the missing documents that prompted the probe, BBC Newsnight has been told.


The inquiry centres on concerns the Home Office did not act on information passed on by Tory MP Geoffrey Dickens.

The inquiry's report is expected to criticise the department's archiving in the 80s and 90s, and dash hopes the so-called "Dickens' dossier" still exists.

The Home Office has refused to comment.
'Lost or destroyed'
The review, led by NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless, was commissioned by the home secretary in July following criticism of an internal Home Office report into how the claims were dealt with.

That review revealed the Home Office had "lost or destroyed" 114 files and could find no evidence of the information compiled by Mr Dickens - and passed to the then Home Secretary Leon Brittan in 1983.

That information was said to contain the names of MPs and police officers who were suspected of being child abusers.

Geoffrey Dickens Geoffrey Dickens was a long-standing campaigner against child abuse

Now, a source familiar with the Wanless report has told BBC Newsnight: "They have looked inside and behind every single cupboard in the department, and they have been round them twice, and they have not been able to find any of them [the documents]."

MP Simon Danczuk, who, in July, called on Lord Brittan to say what he knew about paedophile allegations passed to him in the 1980s, told the programme: "I am worried Peter Wanless has been set up to fail in many respects.

"I don't think he was given enough time to carry out this investigation. I don't think he was provided with enough support within the Home Office and I am worried he didn't get the technological support.

"I think there are some fairly sophisticated forensic techniques that could have been used to establish what documents were available over a 20-year period and I don't think he has been given the opportunity to get to the documents."
'Red herring'
Peter McKelvie, a former child protection manager, whose allegations about child abuse led to a 2012 police investigation, said it should not be an excuse to say the files are lost.

He told Newsnight: "If the file can't be found, I actually personally think that's a little bit of a red herring because there are enough politicians and officials within the Home Office and even within the hierarchies of the three main parties that would be aware of what its content were.

"The information is out there and anyone who tries to deny that is misleading people."

Fiona Woolf Fiona Woolf resigned after disclosures about her links to Lord Brittan

The review is being published as a wider inquiry into historical child sex abuse gets under way despite its chairwoman, Fiona Woolf, resigning following disclosures about her links to Lord Brittan.

The City lawyer's predecessor, Baroness Butler-Sloss, also resigned, similarly over her links with establishment figures.

Elsewhere on Friday, members of the panel have been meeting victims' representatives for a second time.

Some abuse survivors have called for the panel to step down, arguing that the process of appointing its members has not been transparent.

But panel members have indicated that they want to get on with planning the shape and scope of the inquiry.

The BBC's home affairs correspondent Tom Symonds said: "This morning's meeting could result in a confrontation."
May apology
On Monday, Mrs May apologised in the Commons after Mrs Woolf stood down.

Making a statement on the wider child abuse inquiry, Mrs May told MPs: "I know that some members of the House have suggested that the government should publish today the Wanless report about the Home Office permanent secretary's investigation into the so-called Dickens' dossier.

"I can tell the House that the Wanless report will be published next week.

"This is because it is about a separate but related matter to the work of the panel inquiry and I want members of the public and the media to have time to scrutinise both this statement and the Wanless review properly."
« Last Edit: November 19, 2014, 11:10:45 AM by the leveller »


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