London landmark buildings now under Sharia law

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Offline the leveller

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London landmark buildings now under Sharia law
« on: March 17, 2016, 09:50:37 PM »
Dear Mr Swayne,

 

Reading your email below, you clearly have no difficulty with Islam buying up your country piece by piece and you’ll be well aware that Islam is intent on taking your country from the British people.

 

As an MP, you have the duty through the public trust placed in you by virtue of your employment and solemnly sworn oath of allegiance to Her Majesty (thus the British people), to serve and protect according to English Law.  I am sure that on reflection you will realise you have that obligation.  English law as you know is inviolable and demands that you protect Britain from all foreign intervention.

 

Treason Act 1351

1) Levying war against the sovereign in the realm.

2) Adhering to the sovereign's enemies, giving them aid and comfort, in the realm or elsewhere.

 

Act of Supremacy 1559

 

The relevant passages that particularly apply to the EU are highlighted.

“And for the more sure observation of this act and the utter extinguishment of all foreign and usurped power and authority, may it please your highness that it may be further enacted by the authority aforesaid that, if any person or persons dwelling or inhabiting within this your realm or in any other your highness's realms or dominions, advisedly, maliciously, and directly affirm, hold, stand with, set forth, maintain, or defend the authority, pre-eminence, power, or jurisdiction, spiritual or ecclesiastical, of any foreign prince, prelate, person, state . . . , shall by writing, printing, teaching, preaching, express words, deeds, or act, or potentate whatsoever, heretofore claimed, used, or usurped within this realm or any dominion or country being within or under the power, dominion, or obeisance of your highness, or shall advisedly, maliciously, or directly put in ure or execute anything for the extolling, advancement, setting forth, maintenance, or defence of any such pretended or usurped jurisdiction, power, pre-eminence, or authority, or any part thereof, that then every such person and persons so doing and offending, their abettors, aiders, procurers, and counsellors, being thereof lawfully convicted and attainted according to the due order and course of the common laws of this realm [shall suffer specified penalties, culminating in punishment for high treason on the third offence] . . . .”'

 

Bill of Rights 1689

The pertinent part of the Bill of Rights 1689, a Bill over which Parliament have no jurisdiction and commit treason by ignoring it:

Supremacy.

I A B doe sweare ........... And I doe declare That noe Forreigne Prince Person Prelate, State or Potentate hathor ought to have any Jurisdiction Power Superiority Preeminence or Authoritie Ecclesiasticallor Spirituall within this Realme Soe helpe me God.

 

Treason Felony Act 1848

"It is Treason Felony to 'compass, imagine, invent, devise, or intend to:

1) Deprive the Sovereign of the Crown.

2) Levy war against the sovereign in order by force or constraint to compel her to change Her measures or counsels, or in order to put any force or constraint upon, or in order to intimidate or overawe both Houses or either House of Parliament.

3) 'Move or Stir' any foreigner to invade the United Kingdom, or any other country belonging to the Sovereign.

 

Treason as you know is THE most serious crime in English law and whose penalty is unchanged.

 

What do you call it, then, when politicians have for 50 years contrived to deceive and betray the sovereign British people by giving away over their heads, their freedom, sovereignty, independence, right to self determination and the traditions and fabric of their country, to foreign ownership by uncompromising colonisation and to foreign rule by unelected, unaccountable and unapproachable self-serving bureaucrats ?     

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Pauline
 

 -----Original Message-----
From:]
Sent: 15 March 2016 12:52
To:
Subject: Re: London landmark buildings now under Sharia law

 

Rt Hon Desmond Swayne TD MP

Minister of State

 

www.desmondswaynemp.com

 

Follow me on Twitter www.twitter.com/desmondswayne

 

Thanks, Sukuk is just a means of financing without resort to 'usury' (which is also prohibited in the Bible). As for the rest, most of the stuff on the internet is just rubbish.
 D

Definition of sukuk (Islamic bonds)

 

Islamic bonds, structured in such a way as to generate returns to investors without infringing Islamic law (that prohibits riba or interest).

Sukuk represents undivided shares in the ownership of tangible assets relating to particular projects or special investment activity. A sukuk investor has a common share in the ownership of the assets linked to the investment although this does not represent a debt owed to the issuer of the bond.

 

In the case of conventional bonds the issuer has a contractual obligation to pay to bond holders, on certain specified dates, interest and principal. In contrast, under a sukuk structure the sukuk holders each hold an undivided beneficial ownership in the underlying assets. Consequently, sukuk holders are entitled to a share in the revenues generated by the Sukuk assets. The sale of sukuk relates to the sale of a proportionate share in the assets.

Since the beginning of 2000, sukuk have become important Islamic financial instruments in raising funds for long-term project financing. The first sukuk were issued by Malaysia in 2000, followed by Bahrain in 2001.  Since then sukuk have been used by both the corporate sector and states for raising alternative financing.  While sukuk issuance was affected by the global financial crisis, since 2011, sukuk have been growing in popularity.

 

Example

There are various types of sukuk structures relating to the nature of the underlying asset. The most commonly used is where the sukuk relates to a partial ownership of an asset (sukuk al-ijarah). Other types of these bonds relate to partial ownership in in a debt (sukuk murabaha), project (sukuk al-istisna), business (sukuk al-musharaka), or investment (sukuk al-istithmar).

 

 

 


Distinguishing Sukuk from Conventional Bonds
 

 
 
Conventional Bonds
 
Sukuk
 

Asset ownership
 
Bonds don’t give the investor a share of ownership in the asset, project, business, or joint venture they support. They’re a debt obligation from the issuer to the bond holder.
 
Sukuk give the investor partial ownership in the asset on which the sukuk are based.
 

Investment criteria
 
Generally, bonds can be used to finance any asset, project, business, or joint venture that complies with local legislation.
 
The asset on which sukuk are based must be sharia-compliant.
 

Issue unit
 
Each bond represents a share of debt.
 
Each sukuk represents a share of the underlying asset.
 

Issue price
 
The face value of a bond price is based on the issuer’s credit worthiness (including its rating).
 
The face value of sukuk is based on the market value of the underlying asset.
 

Investment rewards and risks
 
Bond holders receive regularly scheduled (and often fixed rate) interest payments for the life of the bond, and their principal is guaranteed to be returned at the bond’s maturity date.
 
Sukuk holders receive a share of profits from the underlying asset (and accept a share of any loss incurred).
 

Effects of costs
 
Bond holders generally aren’t affected by costs related to the asset, project, business, or joint venture they support. The performance of the underlying asset doesn’t affect investor rewards.
 
Sukuk holders are affected by costs related to the underlying asset. Higher costs may translate to lower investor profits and vice versa.

Distinguishing Sukuk from Conventional Bonds
 

 
 
Conventional Bonds
 
Sukuk
 

Asset ownership
 
Bonds don’t give the investor a share of ownership in the asset, project, business, or joint venture they support. They’re a debt obligation from the issuer to the bond holder.
 
Sukuk give the investor partial ownership in the asset on which the sukuk are based.
 

Investment criteria
 
Generally, bonds can be used to finance any asset, project, business, or joint venture that complies with local legislation.
 
The asset on which sukuk are based must be sharia-compliant.
 

Issue unit
 
Each bond represents a share of debt.
 
Each sukuk represents a share of the underlying asset.
 

Issue price
 
The face value of a bond price is based on the issuer’s credit worthiness (including its rating).
 
The face value of sukuk is based on the market value of the underlying asset.
 

Investment rewards and risks
 
Bond holders receive regularly scheduled (and often fixed rate) interest payments for the life of the bond, and their principal is guaranteed to be returned at the bond’s maturity date.
 
Sukuk holders receive a share of profits from the underlying asset (and accept a share of any loss incurred).
 

Effects of costs
 
Bond holders generally aren’t affected by costs related to the asset, project, business, or joint venture they support. The performance of the underlying asset doesn’t affect investor rewards.
 
Sukuk holders are affected by costs related to the underlying asset. Higher costs may translate to lower investor profits and vice versa.
 

 

 

« Last Edit: March 17, 2016, 09:57:09 PM by the leveller »

 
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