EU27 would have to pay more, unless the EU side succeeds in extracting a substan

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Offline the leveller

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EU27 would have to pay more, unless the EU side succeeds in extracting a substantial ‘divorce’ settlement from the UK

 In black and white!

           European Policy Analysis
     The EU budget after 2020
In round numbers, the loss of the UK will mean a hole of around €17 billion (the annual average for the period
2013-15) in the EU’s receipts – roughly 12%. To put this in perspective, it is equivalent to the gross payments into
the EU budget of the twelve Member States which acceded to the EU in 2004 and 2007. This revenue shortfall will only partly be offset by identifiable spending in the UK of about €7 billion (also the annual average for 2013- 15); in other words a net loss of the order of €10 billion
– amounting to the entire budget for the EU’s Horizon 2020 research programme in 2015...

...at the end of March 2019 – reductions in EU spending will be almost impossible because of existing commitments.
This would mean tax-payers in the EU27 would have to pay more, unless the EU side succeeds in extracting a
substantial ‘divorce’ settlement from the UK...
http://www.sieps.se/globalassets/publikationer/2017/sieps_2017_9epa.pdf

After December 2020 EU rules will change, this will tie us into further 'obligations'. The real reason for 'transition' delays.
UK will also lose it's rebate.
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2018/621864/EPRS_BRI(2018)621864_EN.pdf


No deal is the only escape route.
After December 2020 the rules will change which will tie us into further 'obligations'. The real reason for delay.
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/BRIE/2018/621864/EPRS_BRI(2018)621864_EN.pdf
 
HM Treasury estimates that the UK will make around 60% of settlement payments by the end of 2021 but may be making some payments for several decades...
 
The financial settlement
7
HM Treasury took legal advice on the UK’s rights and obligations on leaving the EU.
It has been strongly represented to us by HM Treasury that it would be damaging to the national interest to publish the legal advice in any detail and we accept that this is so at present.
8
The UK will continue to contribute to the EU’s annual budgets in 2019 and 2020 as if it had remained a member state, but the other components of the settlement will require new, untested methods of calculation. When it is no longer a member state, the UK will be outside the established budget-setting process.
This means new mechanisms will need to be developed to calculate its share of payments. In March 2018, the UK government and the Commission published a draft of the withdrawal agreement, which gives some detail on how these mechanisms will
operate (paragraphs 1.9 and 3.2 to 3.3).
https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Exiting-the-EU-The-financial-settlement.pdf


« Last Edit: October 20, 2018, 01:05:12 PM by the leveller »

 
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